Lovingly crafting videos in Southeast Portland

... a Portland videographer exploring new and noteworthy ideas in the world of video production in the Pacific Northwest and around the world.

My name is Abigail Spyker and I have worked with video for ten years, producing a variety of videos ranging from lifestyle documentaries to corporate promotional videos. I love working as a Portland videographer and photographer.

Topics include: filming techniques, video and motion graphics examples, design inspiration, opportunities for videographers, broadcast journalism, visual storytelling, data visualization, education, emerging technologies, and other compelling stories

 

Videographers eagerly witness the rolling out of a new dolly - made from printed parts.  Sweet!
via: fyeah3dprinting

3D printed DSLR camera mini dolly.*
*Made using external parts and 3D printed parts.

This is a cheap (~$25) table dolly for shooting DSLR video. It is made from a canabalized $20 K-Mart skateboard, a few nuts and bolts, and printed parts. The dolly rolls smoothly, and can go straight, at an angle, or in arcs or circles. It is very easy to adjust, or to tighten down. For some related information, and hopefully soon some video, see: protoparadigm.com/2012/03/what-to-do-with-a-3d-printer-video-production-field-use/ Also, yes, this could be made cheaper by making the trucks printed too so it just needs some wheels and bearings, but the goal with this one was to get up and running quickly. The skateboard and other parts were bought, files designed, drafts printed, and the unit assembled and tested all in one evening, the evening before a presentation about special purpose and home-made camera supports for video.

Videographers eagerly witness the rolling out of a new dolly - made from printed parts.  Sweet!

via: fyeah3dprinting

3D printed DSLR camera mini dolly.*

*Made using external parts and 3D printed parts.

This is a cheap (~$25) table dolly for shooting DSLR video. It is made from a canabalized $20 K-Mart skateboard, a few nuts and bolts, and printed parts.

The dolly rolls smoothly, and can go straight, at an angle, or in arcs or circles. It is very easy to adjust, or to tighten down.

For some related information, and hopefully soon some video, see: protoparadigm.com/2012/03/what-to-do-with-a-3d-printer-video-production-field-use/

Also, yes, this could be made cheaper by making the trucks printed too so it just needs some wheels and bearings, but the goal with this one was to get up and running quickly. The skateboard and other parts were bought, files designed, drafts printed, and the unit assembled and tested all in one evening, the evening before a presentation about special purpose and home-made camera supports for video.